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. that is we had a very tough election, in which fundamental issues were debated, the rights of gay and lesbian people, the right to vote because of the assault on the fundamental right to vote that took place in so many states, climate change, a continuation of our commitment to think medicare and social security and the noes thtion th inequality is not a necessary component of the economy. and we want to believe all of those issues. and i think what the president was saying, was, look, we have elections. and when you have a full debate in an election and the outcome is pretty clear cut, then it's his obligation and his right to move forward on all of those issues. >> and as we are watching the navajo nation just went by, their float, one of the things i saw today, melissa, is the whole changing of the demographics of america was reflected at the inauguration, as we look at native americans float goes by, as we heard a president for the first time refer in an inaugural address to same-sex marriage and to gay rights and talking about gender rights and he was sworn in on martin luther king's bib
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
before women got the right to vote. and now we just had a historic election where there are more women in congress than we have ever had before. it's really an incredible movement, and i work at emily's list, and emily's list has been working on it for 28 years to get more women on the pipeline. and we are picking it up. >> sam, it seems to me that the president was almost like an ich bin ein berliner speech. he's a man of color himself. but to embrace all of this together, i have never heard any of it -- none of this they. there was no they. it was all we, a lot of we. >> keep in mind, i thought the theme was that change can spark from the individual. in all these cases you have change being a grassroots entity, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immi
tester is glad to be in this parade. he got re-elected. >> after a tough battle, that's for sure. >> this is the wind river dancers, the wind river reservation all the way from wyoming. they are here to honor all of us with their performance. $6,000 short of their scaled-down fundraising. they are marching anyway and doing an excellent, excellent job. right now i want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer here in washington, d.c. we're right across from the president of the united states on the reviewing stand. there it is, the reviewing stand on the north lawn of the white house. kate bolduan is here, jim acosta is here and we're in "the situation room," a special edition of the situation room watching the wind river dancers from the wind river reservation in wyoming performing for the president of the united states. he's still there. he's still in the reviewing stand. the first lady, sasha and malia have gone inside. i suspect they have to get ready for the balls for tonight. >> it's a very special day, obviously, but a very long day
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
. the next two flags are the flags the u.s. adopted when the president elect's home state became part of the u.s. the middle flag represents the 50 states. president obama plus home state illinois entered the union and 18 -- in 1818, making it the 21st state to join the union. the two flags towards the center, they will display 21 stars. dole in new york, the independent line. -- joel in new york, the independent line. >> i love c-span. inauguration day is a proud day for every american, regardless of party affiliation. i want to address the first caller about poverty. i am a second-generation american, and if you cannot make in this country, you'll be doomed to failure in any other country. host: julie, salt lake city, good morning. caller: i want to thank you for taking my call. i lived in a completely republican state. thank goodness that president obama has prevailed, because i do believe that the majority of people, even though i do it in a republican state, a lot of them did vote for him. unfortunately, i wish we would get rid of the electoral vote and go to the popular vote. i
. maybe roosevelt and hoover an example of that. franklin roosevelt had been elected by a landslide in 1932 over president hoover who was considered to be responsible for the great depression and roosevelt was a great schmoozer. finally, they reduced to looking at the super structure of thing it was the commerce department that was being built and roosevelt said, lovely steel. that was sort of the end of the conversation. the rest of the ride they went in silence. this happens much too often, but not on a second term. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raise
it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to doffs notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legitimate tors. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine except everybod
elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our chief washington correspondent and anchor of ""face the nation."" bob, what
in the second term but is there a reset point? >> the president was popular in the re-election, he wa in a difficult fiscal cliff negotiation where he got the tax increases he wanted. the democrats are united but he faces such quick battles particularly over the debt and over gun legislation that he'd like to pursue, there isn't much of a reset, not much of a honeymoon because there's a carryover of toxic atmosphere in washington when it comes to getting big things done. >> you covered the white house about two terms of the bush administration. what does the president, what is the hard reality of his second term in. >> well he builds up a lot of political capital with re-election and that's very freeing for a second term president but the calendar is short. you have a limited amount of time to really drive the agenda and the president would like to get big things done from immigration to energy, but he's going to be facing trench warfare with republicans over the budget, for some time to come. i think that's going to overshadow most of what he does. >> david gregory thanks very much.
years, so why this year? >> you know, i think it's because he is not running for re-election again, and doesn't have to worry about it, and you have to give credit where credit is due. people like mark phraugin, and he said it's symbolic, and if you don't do anything else it's symbolic, and he cornered me one day at a rally, and he asked me to bring it up to the president, and i did. and the president looked me straight in the eye and said i don't do symbolism. and i said this goes beyond symbolism. i think what it is, this president is a long-term thicker. he was not going to react then. he had an election coming up. and you get 9% of the vote from washingtons. >> and if the president is into symbolism, his so porters would say it shows that he is being driven in a vehicle that is addressing what many districts, we have no representation in congress and our tax dollars don't go and help us, and we have to do something about self government. and so from that start, supporters would hope that he would get more involved in the district of columbia affairs and push for representation
should be done. but you have probably more than any group of elected officials thought about this issue more intently and longer. you have done a great deal of work on this. all of you who deal with the issue every day. i'm not going to ask for a show of hands, but if i did, a lot of people would put their hands up in this room. how many of you mayors attended the funeral of a police officer or an innocent child in a drive-by shooting or shop owner in your city? many of you, many of you have had to attend and many of you, many, many funerals. some of your communities experienced mass shootings, not just in schools, but movie theaters and temples and not unique to big cities. it was -- i happened to be literally, probably turned out to be a quarter of a mile back in 2006 at an outing when i heard gunshots in the woods that we didn't know where we thought there were hunters. i got back to the clubhouse in this outing and saw helicopters. it was a shooting that had just taken place in a small amish school just outside of lancaster, pennsylvania. so it's not just big cities or well-to-do su
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12

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